Lockheed Martin on Open Source and the Cloud

Lockheed Martin's Melvin Greer, Senior Fellow and Chief Strategist, Cloud Computing, noted that the contractor community's development of internal expertise in using open source software will help the government in its adoption of OSS. “When Vivek Kundra, the U.S. Chief Information Officer, unveiled his 25-point implementation plan for IT reform, one of his top initiatives … Continue reading Lockheed Martin on Open Source and the Cloud

Obama, McNealy, and Cognitive Dissonance

Gene Quinn's recent post titled "What Happened to the Obama Open Source Initiative?" criticizes, in turns, open source software, Scott McNealy, the Obama administration, and "business newbies" who want to use the open source software model. Early in the Administration, President Obama asked Scott McNealy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems, to prepare a report on … Continue reading Obama, McNealy, and Cognitive Dissonance

Citizen and government collaboration: let’s work it out.

Over the last couple years, many of us involved with open source in government have had discussions about what it means for citizen coders to become involved in state, local and federal efforts. There are all kinds of legal, ethical, and logistics questions that haven't been answered. Everyone seems to be solving them individually, but … Continue reading Citizen and government collaboration: let’s work it out.

The future of the government forges

The GSA is currently planning forge.gov, which is widely assumed to be based on forge.mil, the much-discussed collaboration platform from the Defense Information Systems Agency, or DISA. forge.mil is a pretty incredible idea: a single destination for testing, certification, and software development in the Defense Department. It sounds obvious, but the idea remains revolutionary. For … Continue reading The future of the government forges

Open Source in Government: Who was first?

Brian Purchia of Burson-Marsteller has a post over on GovFresh about the value of open source to unions. His argument pivots on cost-savings. I think you could make a more expansive argument that includes risk mitigation and innovation, but describing the advantage to unions is an interesting angle I hadn't seen before. I noticed that … Continue reading Open Source in Government: Who was first?

Lockheed Goes Open Source. Blankenhorn Hates It.

A Tin Foil Hat

I was really pleased to read the announcement that Lockheed Martin's social networking platform, EurekaStreams, was released as an open source project today. Lockheed is a very conservative company, and while they're happy to use open source internally and on projects for their customers, this is their first experiment with actually running a project themselves. … Continue reading Lockheed Goes Open Source. Blankenhorn Hates It.